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20131028
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
to hear about the tech giants and nsa spying. google says it's outraged. this is "around the world" on cnn. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael homes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers. >> waiting for the white house briefing, they'll respond to the latest nsa spying allegations and expect to comment on the problems with the obama care website. live as soon as it happens. keep a close eye on the white house. >>> we're all familiar with when you get on the plane, shut off your cell phone, turn off the gadgets, anything with a power button, turn it off. it's been that way for years but things are about to change. at least in the u.s. >> yes. federal airline officials made this big announcement today. just a couple of hours ago. looks like the airline's going to have to change the preflight videos. >> clear. insert mobile phones and electronic devices are turned off. if you're -- >> i love that little video there. delta, chris lawrence, reagan national airport. i'm one of the people in the back of the plane on my phone trying to get the last bit in here, if
>> embroiled in an embarrassing spy scandal, president obama may order the n.s.a. to stop eaves dropping on the leaders of american allies, stripping the agency of some of its powers. >> a pakistan. >> i family that lost their grandmother to a drone strike is on capitol hill to tell their story. first, they share it with aljazeera america. >> sex crimes on campus, surprising new research that the majority of attacks on campus of committed by repeat offenders. >> it's hard breaking. >> it was heart wrenching. >> one year after hurricane sandy, some families still have not been able to pic pick up the pieces. why an insurance loophole is preventing some from rebuilding their storm-ravaged homes. >> good morning. welcome to august america. it's great to have you with us. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas day den. the national security agency is now under fire here at home. >> both the president and congress are considering changes that would limit the n.s.a.'s sweeping ability to collect intelligence. >> words like constraint, transparency and increased oversight are now used when ta
. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. >> the head of the n.s.a. defiantly defending the spy agency. the general says gathering intelligence around the world is critical and helps to keep america safe from terrorists. >> the war raging in syria claiming some surprising new victims. children are being diagnosed with polio because they don't have access to adequate health care. >> it is reported that at 8:58 p.m., a huge object believing to be a meteor right fell on a farm. >> 75 years ago, martians innovated the planet or people listening to the radio thought they did. a look back at the war of the world broadcast that caused widespread panic across the country. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> good to have you with us on this wednesday. two hours from now, the health and human services secretary will testify. >> many are saying she should be fired. >> kathleen see bellous will be asked to explain the failure of the health care website. we have more on what she might say today. >> good morning. you know, kathleen
? >> well, let me say something about the nsa. i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they're given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence framework is put together by the administration. it begins with the director of national intelligence, it goes to the white house, it's the president, it's the nsc the cabinet and then the framework is formed. now, what happens is, people add to it, state wants this, department of state wants to know this. or somebody else wants to know that. priorities are ranked. as i understand it these are the priorities. one, terrorism. two, support of our military abroad. three, nuclear counter proliferation. four, hard targets. and now cyber. and those are the main areas. so essentially the nsa is told to do certain things and it does it. what i think we need to do, we work very well with the house committee and leadership, mike rogers and congressman rupersberger is review of the intelligence framework of how all this gets together. what the criteria for inclusi
of the nsa and the president's top intelligence chief are both there to testify as anger and suspicion grow over accusations of widespread u.s. spying. the worst of it, tapping the phones of u.s. allies. >> we, all of us in the intelligence community, are very much aware that the recent unauthorized disclosures have raised concerns that you've alluded to, both here in congress and across the nation, about our intelligence activities. we know the public wants to understand how its intelligence community uses its special tools and authorities and to judge whether we can be trusted to use them appropriately. we believe we have been lawful and at the rigorous oversight we've operated under has been effective. >> here are a couple questions. these are the biggies. what did the president know? when did he know it and what specifically depends on who you ask. the senate intelligence committee chaired by diane feinstein, she says, we knew nothing, claiming they were kept in the dark about what the nsa was up to. but other officials say president obama or at least his white house staff knew all abou
from germany to australia. one report claiming not only was the nsa tapping the private cell phone of the chancellor of germany, angela merkel, ever since 2010, but that president obama knew about it. the nsa hitting back, trashing the report with this statement, saying, general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 this alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel. newsroom reports claiming otherwise are simply not true. germany may be in the spotlight, but that's one of just 30 countries. u.s. allies saying they're furious at the alleged extent of nsa surveillance on their turf. today, the u.s. ambassador to spain was called in for a dressing down by the spanish foreign minister. a spanish newspaper publishing a shocking number, 60. 6-0 million phone calls of average citizens intercepted by the nsa in the past year alone. so joining me now, christiane amanpour, cnn's chief international correspondent and a professor at princeton university. christiane to you, fi
the n.s.a. did it behind their backs. a brand-new bombshell on the growing n.s.a. scandal. >> just six months after the boston bombing, the red sox show boston is indeed strong. >> at fenway park, it hasn't happened for 95 years. the red sox world champion. >> that was joe buck and that was the red sox. their third championship this century is off to a good start. a surprising start. live reaction this horning. i believe the car was once on its wheels. "fox & friends" starts now. >> this is curt schilling. you're watching "fox & friends." >> one of the neighbor kids is fiddling with the light switch. >> happy halloween everybody. >> that's right. today we're going to dress up. by the end of the day we're going to be dressed up as something or somebody. we'll all be part of a theme. who do you think it is? give a guess. you can e-mail us at friends@foxnews.com or go to twitter or facebook us. you can also send us pictures, if you like to dress up or your kids. >> it's been hallow-week, not just halloween. >> if kids have a bunch of parties, they want a different costume for each party.
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
overall gagss of nsa had been monitoring millions of citizens and heads of state around the world and we have more. >> reporter: the u.s. government practice of listening in on the phone calls of leaders of allied countries could be about to end. in an interview president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose, to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure that what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean it's what they should be doing. this is prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of angela merkel's phone in 2010. anonymous officials say that is not true and that a white house review only discovered the surveillance of world leaders in the summer and say the bugging of merkel's phone and soon after. a delegation from the european parliament that is visiting washington is also worried about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizens. one report from spain suggests the nsa tracked 60 million calls in the country in the space of a month. >> we need
worker edward snowden, revelations that the nsa spied on germany's chancellor angela merkel have proadvocated outrage in the country. >>> french police have released a sketch of a man wanted for the murder of a family in the alps, a shooting that is still unexplained. >>> a dutch children's rights organization is warning of what it describes as an e epidemic of youngsters being forced to perform sexual acts. handed those names to interpol. >> she is the weapon against sex traffic, she is not real. prowling the web for sex, one group trying to end it all. these are some of the men who have been identified as terrorists. researchers log on to chattel rooms pretending to be young girls. within seconds they are being offered money in return for things we cannot repeat. >> whenever i open a chat room dozens of men swarm at me within minutes. from families, good jobs, they're athletes, it's unbelievable how diverse the pattern is. >> this is one of the chat rooms the team are using. 10 f philippines. ten years old, female, philippines. we deliberately kept the camera a little bit far a
? intelligence officials assume we will over correct this. there will be a move to really constrain what the nsa and our andlligence agencies do talksf the 9/11 report about it. quite sure, it can go too far. -- >> sure. we are not anywhere near going to far. the pendulum can go to far. the whole nsa metadata issue is hard and fast. give you my views on it but nonetheless, i have not seen the pendulum swing too far yet. >> i have spoken to some officials, some off the record -- >> i don't think he's unstable. very friendly conversations, first of all. he's very direct, some of the about us ande said our people. i don't understand politics, by the way. why is he saying things that make it either on likely, less less likely,ikely, what's the politics? i don't get it. on the politician. forsee they say things public consumption -- i'm the politician. i know it's rare. once in a great while the politician will say something for the public that they don't exactly believe themselves or would say differently. why is he saying the things? the conversation i want to emphasize is that they are friendly, v
in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell: the real damage of leaking that document was that certainly they could focus their counter-intelligence efforts on those places where we're being successful and not have to worry as much about those places where we
about the drone attacks. the nsa revelations have undermined some confidence. now, there's a number of different reasons, but i think what i'm going to do is point out the reasons why i think we have not had as much success as we had hoped in terms of building broad support for our campaign and, second, what we ought to do about it. i think the reasons why are fairly clear. number one, as i mentioned, is the drone strikes. it has gotten a fair amount of attention. you know, the number of civilian casualties, the justification for those attacks. the world is focused on this. now, i do believe that drones are getting an unfair portion of the blame here. a drone is a weapon of war. i don't think the rest of the world would feel any better if we were launching cruise missiles from out in the ocean. i don't think that changes it. there's a little too much of an emphasis on how this has fundamentally changed things, that a drone is more dangerous than sending in a seal team on launching a bunch of cruise missiles. they're not the perfect instrument they are sometimes described to be, and
clapper and nsa direct or general keith allen discussed the nsa surveillance program and spying on foreign governments before the house intelligence committee hearing earlier this week. >> i never expected to write an entire book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age. i was diagnosed at 36. i was astonished at how different i thought it was -- how different i was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer and what i expected cancer be. and i sort of expected it -- i expected it to run like a well oiled machine in which cure wasn't obviously guaranteed, but people knew about my particular cancer at be followed and what i found was being really, really different. i couldn't help but i started to write about it. >> the head of the wrecks on trans next round of talks, george washington university hosted regional experts were monday. a farmer winning presidential candidate and former official at the american embassy in a rant to our commenting on prospects for the agreement. the impact of president rouhani election. nuclear weapons talks begin on november 7.
-ed in "the l.a. times." you called for changes to be made to the nsa's massive phone data gathering program and say it's the evidence that it has made us safer is limited. instead it appears that the utility of the metadata program has been conflated with the success of other collection efforts. how do you determine how much surveillance, then, is too much? >> i think we have to weigh what is the size of the program, what is the magnitude of the collection and what are the results it's getting? and even more than that, even if it met that test, even if the metadata program was very successful, we also have to ask, is it necessary to collect all this data or can the program be restructured? in my view, the program can be restructured in a way that has the telecommunications providers retain their own data. i doesn't require the government to get all that data. when we suspect that a phone number is connected to a plot, then we go to the phone company, much as we would do in a criminal investigation. so i think we can get the same information we need. we can continue to protect the country. w
-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program in a house committee. -- kelley,elly author of biographies. .nd american history tv remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of the assassination. sunday at 3 p.m. eastern. >> president obama met with iraqi prime minister to talk about the partition between the u.s. and iraq. he addressed the syrian civil war and iran's nuclear program. this is about 20 minutes. >> all set? all set? i want to welcome back prime minister maliki to the white house. it's been two years since the last u.s. troops left from iraq, but the strategic partnership between our two countries remains very strong. we honor the lives that were lost, both american and iraqi, to bring about a functioning democracy in a country that previously had been ruled by a vicious dictator. and we appreciate prime minister maliki's commitment to honoring that sacrifice by ensuring a strong, prosperous, inclusive and democratic iraq. >> [speaker translates] >> we had a wide-ranging discussion about economic issues, regional issues, and security issues. [speaker tr
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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